Daylighting

Daylighting

Daylighting is lighting an indoor space with windows and skylights that allow natural light into the building. Electric lighting energy use can be reduced by simply installing fewer electric lights because abundant daylight is present, or by dimming or switching electric lights automatically in response to the presence of daylight, a process known as daylight harvesting.

On new construction, windows and eaves can be designed to maximize indirect, or reflected, light into a space in order to keep cooling costs down in summer. Sidelighting from a window is the most common source of daylighting. Light-colored walls and ceilings can reflect incoming natural light. Light can also be reflected by light shelves and louvered or Venetian window coverings.

Daylighting increases energy performance and impacts building size and costs by downsizing fans, ductwork and cooling equipment because overall cooling loads are reduced, allowing for tradeoffs between efforts made for daylighting and the sizing of the air handling and cooling systems. Daylighting will only translate to savings when electrical lighting is dimmed or turned off and is replaced with natural daylight.

Contact a Graybar Lighting Consultant to learn more about saving energy and money with daylighting.